6 Best Pots for African Violets

African Violets are a beautiful flowering houseplant that can make quite the impact when taken care of properly. They can be a pit picky so there’s a few things you need to know especially when it comes to the pot it’s in! We’re going to walk you through some of the best African Violet pots for your beautiful plant!

If you’re new to African Violets, let’s go over a few basic things. As we mentioned, they can be an intimidating plant to some! While this post won’t have all the exact details on how to care for an African Violet (that post is coming soon!) it will have some basic information worth knowing.

African Violet Care

African Violet

African Violets go by the Genus name of Saintpaulia Ionantha. They are smaller indoor plants making them easy house plants to add to any home since they don’t take up much space.

One of the most important things to know about these lovely plants is how to water it. You can’t water an African Violet like you do with a hardy plant like a neon pothos. You need to take extra care when watering these delicate plants.

First, you’ll want to use room temperature water that has been sitting out for 24-48 hours. This allows it to neutralize and also get to the right temperature.

Next you’ll want to only water the base, never touching the foliage. If you get water on the foliage there’s a very high chance it will damage the plant and cause spots.

Before watering, always check the top of the soil. Water your African Violet when it’s feels just slightly moist. Don’t let it dry out and definitely don’t let it sit in water.

African Violets do best in a well draining soil. If you mix your own potting mix a good rule of thumb is an equal mix of peat moss, vermiculite and perlite.

They like bright sunlight but not direct sunlight. Be sure to give it indirect light so you don’t scorch the plant. You can also put them under fluorescent lights that are about 12-15 inches above the leaves.

Good news for you pet owners, these plants are non toxic to all your furry friends according to ASPCA!

Now on to the pots!

Pots for African Violets

Best African Violet Pots

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As mentioned above, watering is a huge factor in the health of your African Violet. Getting the right pot is key to making watering easier and better for your plant.

If you’re looking for a new pot for your plant, here’s what you need to know!

Materials for African Violet Pots

First up there are 3 main materials used in pots for African Violets – clay pots, plastic pots and ceramic pots.

Clay Pots

Clay or terra cotta pots are another good option for African Violets. Clay pots are very porous. This is great for ensuring that when you water your plant the water doesn’t stay inside the pot causing root rot.

However, because clay pots have such good drainage, you may need to water your plant a bit more.

Best African Violet Pots
Best African Violet Pots

Clay pots typically come in the brown clay looking color which is very on trend right now! They’re also very inexpensive making them an ideal choice for someone looking to not spend a ton of money on a pot.

Plastic Pots

Plastic pots can be another great option for your African Violet. Like terra-cotta pots, they’re typically very inexpensive making them an ideal choice for someone who’s not super confident in their plant skills. If your plant dies relatively quickly, you’re not out a ton of money!

Plastic pots are flexible and lightweight and come in tons of styles and colors. They’re easy to match to any type of décor!

If you chose a plastic pot, be sure to get one with drainage holes on the bottom. Plastic isn’t porous so the drainage holes will ensure that excess water can get out of your pot without sitting in the bottom causing root rot.

Many plastic pots have built in saucer bottoms. This woks great to allow the water to drain from your pot.

There’s lot of plastic African Violet pots to choose from!

Ceramic Pots

Many times people think ceramic pots are just terra cotta pots with some paint but you’re wrong! They are very similar but also very different.

Best African Violet Pots

Ceramic pots are typically glazed with a layer of lacquer. This process will often times minimize how porous your pot is which decreases the amount of moisture that will naturally be able to get out of your pot.

If you chose a ceramic pot, you’ll definitely want one with drainage holes like your plastic pot. This will allow the water to seep through the bottom to again, not cause root rot, since ceramic pots retain water. You’ll need to take extra care when watering your plant in this pot to make sure it doesn’t retain too much water.

These pots are typically much more beautiful than your typical terra cotta pot making them a great choice for aesthetic but not the best choice for your African Violet.

Type of African Violet Pots

Self-Watering

If you’re new to African Violets or a beginner plant person, self watering pots are a great pot to start with. These pots have a water reservoir located at the bottom of the pot that allows your plant to take in water when it needs it.

A self-watering pot is ideal for new plants or mini African Violets but not as ideal for very mature African Violet plants.

Self-watering pots are also a great option for people who travel a lot. Since African Violets don’t like to be too dry, having the option for your plant to be watered while you’re away is the best way to keep them happy!

6 Best African Violet Pots

Best African Violet Pots

Here are a few of the best African Violet pots for you to choose from!

1. Mkono 3 Pack Self Watering Plastic Planter

Mkono 3 Pack Self Watering Plastic Planter

If you’re sticking with the plastic variety of self-watering pots, these simple white pots are a great option. They come in 3 different sizes and can be used for a variety of plants.

These pots can water your African Violets for about 10 days. They use a cotton rope that dips down into the water reservoir that will then suck up moisture and give your plant the necessary nutrients.

2. Ceramic Pot with Saucer

Ceramic Pot with Saucer

Ceramic pots, as mentioned above, are a great classy option of pots for your African Violet. These a have drainage holes which allow enough water to drain out and not cause damage or root rot to your plant.

These come in a pack of 3 but all 3 pots are different sizes giving you a beautiful look to your shelf!

3. Blue Self Watering Ceramic Planter

Blue Self Watering Ceramic Planter

We have another ceramic option for you but this time it’s a self watering option! This beautiful blue ceramic pot has a 4.75″ opening that will fit a 4″ plant in the inner pot for planting.

This self-watering pot works by filling up the bottom of the outside pot with water. You’ll then place the inside pot with your plant inside it. The water will seep up through the unglazed bottom portion of the inside pot.

It won’t fade or crack in the sun and makes a beautiful addition to any home!

4. Aquaphoric Self Watering Planter

Aquaphoric Self Watering Planter

Ok, all you newbies or anyone nervous to try your hand at African Violets, this is for you! This planter is fool proof for watering your plants the correct amount every time.

It has a handy water level indicator so you know exactly when to fill up your pot with water when it’s getting low. You don’t even need to remove the pot to fill it up, you can just pour right into the hole at the top near the rim of the pot!

It uses a fiber soil that’s included to draw up the right amount of water and oxygen to your plant. It comes in a variety of colors and makes watering your plants easy peasy!

5. Self Aerating Self Watering Pot

Self Aerating Self Watering Pot

This simple pot is one of the best selling pots on Amazon! It’s self-watering which will hold enough water to keep your African Violet hydrated for 2 weeks. It does this by using it’s hollow legs to reach down into the water reservoir to allow the soil inside the legs to naturally pull up water to the plant when it needs it.

It’s also self-aerating which helps minimize root rot and fungus. This pot features open slats on the bottom. This encourages oxygen to circulate through the soil which helps it to not rot or form mold.

You add water easily using the clip on watering attachment on the side. You can leave it on for easy filling or remove it in between waterings.

6. Terracotta Pot

Terracotta Pot

Terracotta pots are some of my favorite pots ever. They’re so versatile for a variety of plants and their color is neutral enough to go with any decor.

This set of 3 planters with coordinating saucers are perfect for your African Violets! They have drainage holes to ensure proper drainage and a beautiful matte finish.

Repotting Your African Violet

Many plant experts recommend repotting your African Violet in fresh soil two times a year. This process will encourage your plant to grow healthy and continue to produce beautiful blooms.

African violet

How do you know when you should repot your plant? When it looks like it is outgrowing its pot. If you see roots popping up at the rim of the pot or see roots poking through the drainage holes, it’s definitely time to repot!

Potting Up

Potting up is simply the fancy name for the process of repotting your African Violet from a small pot to a larger pot. You’ll want to get a pot that’s a couple inches bigger than your old pot.

Place a layer of fresh soil at the bottom of your new pot. Then transfer the plant to the new pot and add additional soil around the plant to secure it.

Potting Down

If you’re current pot size happens to be too big for your African Violet or your soil remains too wet, you’ll want to size down to a smaller pot.

First, you’ll want to find a pot that’s a couple inches smaller than your current pot (or more if your current pot is way too big).

Then you’ll want to remove your African Violet from its current pot and remove the excess soil from the roots. Then you’ll gently put it in the smaller pot. If you need additional soil, don’t use the old soil. Instead use new soil to encourage a healthy plant.

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